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second amendment rights and the second amendment rights of our law-abiding law-ag citizens. we have seen the newtown parents here in washington bravely telling their stories. they deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of aurora deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of more than 30 people who die every single day at the hands of gun violence deserve more from this body. my friends, it is simply time to act. today is the day for this body to show the american people that their voices matter. that when 90% of americans demand us to expand background checks, that we can deliver. we should be able to agree today that we no longer need military-style weapons and ammunition clips on our streets. and we should be able to agree today that it's time to crack down on the illegal handguns being trafficked in our streets into the hands of criminals. four years ago, i met the parents of naisha pryor yard. naisha was a beautiful 17-year-old honor student killed in the prime of her life by an illegal handgun when she was just spending t
and use tax laws and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president, i would object to any further proceedings in regard to this bill. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be placed on the calendar. mr. reid: mr. president, today this august body will honor the memory of 20 first-grade children, little babies who were gunned down, most of them shot multiple times. we will also honor the teachers and administrators who were killed that day in newtown, connecticut. but we're also going to honor with this legislation tens of thousands of others who were killed by guns each year here in america. we're going to do that by voting on a number of measures to strengthen the laws to prevent gun violence in this nation. mr. president, the families of innocents killed in newtown, aurora, in carson city, blacksburg, in oak creek and columbine really deserve these votes. where do i stand on these democratic proposals? this afternoon the senate will vote on a compromised background check proposal crafted by senators manchin, toomey, kirk and schumer, all experienced l
. ratified by the senate or the law of the land. and it sounds to me like one of the punchlines of your account, even though washington powers did grow, he did have a republican understanding, which required him to be very attentive to the commitments that were made by the nation. in the 1770s, we were not in position to make international commitments, but we did it with didn't have a lot of statutes on the book, but we have resolutions. would you not say when it washingtons experiences the commander-in-chief has a constitutional obligation to take seriously the commitment the nation has made in conventions like the geneva convention. .. >> i think it's important for the commander-in-chief to be looking at commitments that we make. >> others? more questions? speeches? opinions about canada? [laughter] >> [inaudible]. >> the former dean wants to make a speech about her youth. [laughter] >> i spent many summers canoeing in canada and singing every morning oh, candidate, which is beautiful. for that reason i made a point in junior high school of studying the history of canada, and why i ha
tragedy to a law office in san francisco in 1993. where a crazed gunman -- i remember his name but i won't say it -- with an assault weapon killed eight people and wounded six. one of those people was a brave warrior who threw his body over the body of his wife, sacrificing his own life to save hers. now, that young man was one of my son's best friends, and i know personally how these horrific and senseless tragedies live on with the survivors. the parents, the spouses, the children, the family and the friends. it changes their lives and it pierces their hearts forever. so i've told you a couple of stories about california, but let me say this. let's look at what's happened across this nation since sandy hook. in the 120 days since sandy hook, more than 2,200 americans have been killed by gun violence. hardly anyplace was spared. now, we know there are many, many firearms in america. 300 million firearms in the united states. if you were to divide that up, that would be one gun per person. of course, there are many people who just have many, many guns. now, this is a 50% increase in the
with our government's top national security priority, which is the lawful effective and humane interrogation of this subject for the purposes of gathering intelligence. the boston attacks were clearly inspired by the violent ideology of transnationallist islamist terrorism. so we need to learn everything we can about what foreign terrorists or terrorist groups the suspect and his brother might have associated with, whether they were part of additional plots to attack our nation, and what other relevant information the suspect may possess that could prevent future attacks against the united states or our interests. i think we need to delve further into this whole issue of the education that some people who are motivated by these base ideologies obtain over the internet and the effect that it's having. we should at least know about that. our civilian justice system offers a responsible option for striking this balance with american citizens. it allows the justice department to delay reading a suspect his miranda rights if doing so is in the interest of -- quote -- "public safety.
by tennessee law. and if you don't, well then you don't have to do business in tennessee. it's just that simple and fair. in terms of imposing a new tax, this bill does not create one new tax. first, there are no federal taxes in here, none. and second, we don't even have the power to impose a new state tax, a state sales tax, nor would we try. no new taxes. simply a question of compliance and collecting the taxes already owed in the 46 states that currently have sales and use taxes. i urge my colleagues to come forward tonight at 5:30, vote for cloture on the motion to proceed. let us engage in this important debate. let us not put this off another day, another week, another month. let's bring this to a conclusion in the senate with a good, wholesome debate on a bipartisan basis, germane, relevant, constructive amendments that address some of the issues are welcome. bring them forward and let's not burn up the hours of the day and the hours of the week in quorum calls but let's get down to the business of the senate we were sent to do. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding
. they now expect more than 40 percent of the claims to be back law during either of these two years. so in revising these projections what matters did you look at and what did they -- what additional you? >> i looked at the actual submissions of receipts of claims that we have received from our veterans of the last five months. each month they have been lowered and are expected volume. >> the math works out to where you would have only a 40% backlog situation. >> no, it doesn't. i don't think that you all would throw me out of here if i said that that would happen. is now where we are. we are at about 69 percent of our plans right now that our older than 125 days, working every single day to drive that never south. we're doing it to focus on how people process technology solutions. as far as we can pushing a productivity by folks from i can tell you today that 70 percent more effective and higher productivity than they were prior to us moving into this transformation plan. >> last year he testified that during 2013 the backlog would be reduced from 60% to 40%, and that would -- and ' --
, a bill to restore states' sovereign rights to enforce state and local sales and use tax laws, and for other purposes. mr. reid: i ask for a second reading and object to my own request. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be read for a second time on the next legislative day. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate recess subject to the call of the chair. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate stands in recess subject to the call of the chair. >>> one day after the boston bombings a bipartisan watch group said the government used torture and illegal interrogation methods after the september 11 attacks in 2001. that report is next on c-span2. >>> she came into the white house, she was a 47-year-old lady that he did politics. she was deeply depressed at the death of her son and especially under the terrible circumstances in which she died. she didn't have many friends unfortunately, but she did have a wonderful family there always seems to be somebody there and i don't think he did very much but she was a very intellectual woman,
and services and law firm income. if you want to encourage small business, we can work together. >> we cannot merthyr posted the code to try and alleviate pressure of taxes, but instead of having loopholes, why don't we have the raise? that way they decide for themselves what to do with capital, how to create jobs. there is where going to have an issue when it comes to tax reform. i don't want it well on this because i'm putting myself on the clock so we can get to everybody else here. has the president made any proposals since he's been president to raise taxes on families earning less than $200,000 for $250,000 for joint filers? >> the pledges prison and a pledge that it will not hit 50 below 250. another's disagreements on categorizing, but i'd be happy to have the conversation. >> i'm just trying to save the supreme court says the mandate is a task that obviously has everybody. including people making less than $250,000. the cigarette tax, smokers don't just make about $250,000. but the new 28% tax rate limitation on deductions kicks in families making $220,000. the point is your already
background is in the law and, actually, he began his background in law at his family's kitchen table. his father, rex lee, was a law school dean, assistant u.s. attorney general and solicitor general for ronald reagan. senator lee is a graduate of brigham young university and byu law school, was a law clerk for judge dean benson of the u.s. district court of the district of utah and then judge sam alito's clerk when he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the 3rd circuit. he served as an attorney -- assistant u.s. attorney general in utah and general counsel to the governor of utah before turning to private practice. and then in 2010, that important election year, he decided to run united yorking out an -- knocking out an incumbent u.s. senator and a party-endorsed candidate to become the primary candidate and win the general election. senator lee is now on the judiciary committee, serves as ranking member of the antitrust competition policy and consumer rights subcommittee. he also sevens on the armed service -- serves on the armed services committee and the joint economic committee and
,ming. mr. presiden this amendment protects the privacy and sety of law-abiding gun owners. when government officials release gun ownership information it puts many lives at risk. this includes the lives of lawful gun owners, the lived of law enforcement and the lives of ctheic violence. state or local governments that release private gun owner information will be penalized 5% of their federal program funding. this includes the release of private information on individuals 0 who have licenses to purchase or who possess or who carry firearms. the funding that's withheld will then be redistributed to the states that are in compliance. this amendment will ensure that gun owners across the nation do not have their private gun owner information publicly released. thank you, mr. president. and i urge all my colleagues to support the amendment. mr. leahy: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: this is a case of washington being big brother and telling each one of the states whether it's wyoming, vermont, or connecticut here's what you have to do. we have no idea
and decisions, which obviously affect complying with the law of the land if we have to. >> if i may follow-up, do you have an intention for a timetable for when the department would get back to the committee on it intension and plan for complying? >> i have to look at the review the deputy secretary of defense, chairman of the joint chiefs are leading and preceded on that basis. i don't want an expectation that isn't correct. that's why want to make sure i understand what is expected. as to your questions about overseas and other adamant however and the observation about assessing what you have to do to comply with these new realities. yes his affairs. we have been consolidating and closing facilities overseas the last few years. we'll have a study complete at the end of this year, specific way on additional recommendations of consolidating overseas. should be i agree. i think the leadership, dod donate to the terror infrastructure in this country as well. >> can i just had a couple of facts? there's about 30 more scheduled over the next 30 years in addition to the consolidation. we've bee
, elected official, law enforcement, they really present us with a set of complex questions. and above all, though, i have to repeat that the justice department, our federal united states department of justice, has the responsibility to enforce the controlled substances act. and that remains unchanged. to -- no state, no executive can nullify a statute that's been passed by congress. as the department of justice has noted, though, federal drug enforcement resources -- just like i did as a police chief -- we prioritize and target the serious crimes. serious crimes of drug dealing, violent crime and trafficking. and let's be clear that law enforcement officials take an oath of office to uphold federal law, and they're going to continue to pursue drug traffickers and drug dealers and transnational criminal organizations, all of which weaken our communities, and they pose very serious threats to our nation. and too often discussions about marijuana, though, dwell on this issue of legalization and whether making the drug more widely and easily available -- which it would be when it becomes lega
in for a long time. the law requires that. beyond that we don't know for sure. we have had difficult negotiations over the second part that have the guest worker program and make sure that it's both at will and contract so it serves all of agricultural. because we know at some point we need additional workers beyond the highly trained skilled workers that are currently doing the work in the country that are likely to get a blue card. there will be additional workers needed down the road. we have to a viable worker program. the current program is not that program. if we have the blue card program in our existing h2a we would be back here in a few years, senator, telling you we have a big problem. >> my time is . >> that's what we've got avoid. we have to make sure we don't make the same mistake as 1986. >> thank you. we have two unique situations on the committee, as we mentioned with senator cornyn who had to be absent and all of us understand why. there's no question he should have been in texas and was. the other senator feinstein who is handled the ag negotiations. both will be gi
sometime in the middle of the next decade. since the trust fund can't borrow if the laws are changed medicare will be unable to pay full payments for charges in the age i trust fund. it will only be able to reimburse providers 85% of what they are charging. so clearly legislative action has to be made before that he either to raise taxes or slow the growth in spending or preferably a little bit of both. i my reckoning i have completed my assignment and rather than take a gold star as i said i want to have a couple of general observations. the first when we have discussiodiscussio ends like this we should make clear what our goal this. if our goal is to moderate the growth of medicare costs what cost are we talking about quicksilver talking about the federal government scots? are we talking about the federal government and beneficiaries cost or are we talking about federal government scots in the beneficiaries cost and the cost borne by states localities and private payers? in other words, when we talk about medicare for former cost savings you can reduce medicare programs federal cos
the audience. please wait until you get a microphone before u.s. to because of laws we will pick you up on camera. u.s. a question? down here in front. you have to wait for the microphone. and copley's to do as a favor. not accusing you, don't make a speech. as the question. >> my question is whether their is a real parallel between the argument for abolishing slavery and the argument for abolishing war. >> sounds like that's yours. >> the question is, is there real parallel? i don't know. the point that i was trying to make was i think every generation does seven things and italy. we do things that make us more -- morally queasy, but we think we have to do them. i would say that for our generation as for pretty much every generation before us, war is one of those things. again, ask for a show of hands. how many people think the war is a good thing and have many people think that war should never be used as a policy? >> we are then obviously all conflicted. i think if you look back on previous generations, to think that we can't morally understand how honest, sincere people could believ
in cleveland working for a law firm, and this next call comes from bobby in ohio. >> caller: i've got a question for you in regards to the comment you made about rg 3:and the article about him being called an uncle tom. why would you state that person saying that would be republican? wouldn't democrats actually sometimes have feelings like that? i'm a republican, and i don't feel that way towards rg iii, so i'm just curious why you would say that. >> guest: you either misunderstood what i said, or i said it badly. what i said was the espn guy criticized rg iii because he thought he was republican. he said there's a rumor he's republican, i don't know about that. he's got a white fiancee, i don't know about that. he called him a cornball brother because he suspected that rg iii was a republican, but he had a white fiancee. that is why this caster called him a cornball brother which i think is a racist thing. so i'm sorry if i misexplained it. >> host: go ahead, bobby, you're still on the line. >> caller: i appreciate that. i agree the same way you do then. i think it's totally a racist
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
signing up patients in the emergency room. without the health law that's going to continue. community health clinics will put some of these consumer sisters who will sign peoplesoft. that's where a lot of the uninsured go and that brings up an interesting point about taxes. you asked how they are going to collect the fines. they will be a will to collect those fines when they file taxes. over 80% of the uninsured are filing taxes. we know where they are so they won't be able to collect those fines. also may represent an opportunity to get those uninsured people signed up. you're already putting a lot of information, your social security number, your income. that's enough information to tell the government what you qualify for. you qualify for medicaid or to qualify for exchange? that will be an easy way to get people signed up that having to have them take the extra step of signing up through a separate application or another person or going to the post office or wherever you're going to see these basically. >> host: jenny gold is a correspondent with kaiser health. kaiser health news
and the district of columbia that do not recognize some form of conceal gun carry law. in other words, it is part of the public policy of 49 states that conceal handgun licenses may be obtained by lawful owners. our amendment would allow persons with concealed handgun permits to carry those weapons as they travel between jurisdictions and not -- and avoid any sort of prosecution. this does not create a national standard. it does not apply to jurisdictions that don't otherwise recognize the right to conceal carry. and it would act, in effect, like a driver's license so you don't have to get a separate driver's license in each state that you travel through. and for those who believe background checks that are important, this is background checks on steroids. i'd ask my colleagues to support the amendment. mr. schumer: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from new york. mr. schumer: yeah, this amendment would wreak havoc in large portions of america, suburban and urban areas. now, the bottom line is very simple. wyoming, maybe concealed carry works. every police officer in america -- a
zones. and so another thing that i would do, more of this point involves local laws and federal law, but if i were in charge of that school district i would be lobbying to allow teachers to have concealed carry, to have a gun locked up in a desk drawer, you know, for the principal demands. ultimately, that's the only thing i know of that might've saved any lives in the situation. we have gun registration up there. the cities that we are the most significant gun control seem to have the most significant crime in our country. >> what's wrong with the concept of universal registration? >> i think one doesn't go to the problem if the problem is mass shootings by young men at gun free zones, registration doesn't deter these young men. registration works for law-abiding citizens. nearly if you look at crime, nearly 90% of crime is committed by guns that are bought illegally already. if you look at gun shows, i think in 2004 they did a survey of inmates and it was like one, 1.7% are committed with guns from gun shows. i think, let's, if the background checks were, why do we enforce what we
human rationality. people do all kinds of really stupid things. we enact stupid laws sometimes that a lot of people agree on more because certain interest groups influence others. look at the gun legislation. yeah it's for the failure to enact it is driven by the economic interest of a certain small bunch of businesses but is that really why a huge number of other individuals who believe that's a good thing to do or wildly misinterpret the second amendment because they feel it within themselves. with regard to slavery and you jumped off from that, one of the things that became and has become clear to me the more i have delved into the world of the slave owner it's self and indeed the pre-emancipation north where it wasn't really all that different, is that a lot of people really liked slavery. they liked it. yes it was profitable but it wasn't always all that profitable and a motivator particularly in the 19th century was much of the south it was up into the respectable middle class to own a slave. it gave you a status in the stature that you might not have otherwise so why did
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